Sydney Opera House

the Sydney Opera House is a multi-venue performing arts centre in Sydney. Situated on Bennelong Point in Sydney Harbour, the facility is adjacent to the Sydney Central Business District and the Royal Botanic Garden, between Sydney and Farm Coves.

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Sydney Opera House

Bondi Beach

Bondi Beach or Bondi Bay (/ˈbɒndaɪ/ BON-dye) is a popular beach and the name of the surrounding suburb in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Bondi Beach is located 7 km (4 mi) east of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of Waverley Council, in the Eastern Suburbs. Bondi, North Bondi and Bondi Junction are neighbouring suburbs. Bondi is one of the most visited tourist sites in Australia.

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Bondi Beach

Royal Botanic Garden

The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney is a major botanical garden located in the heart of Sydney, Australia. Opened in 1816, the garden is the oldest scientific institution in Australia and one of the most important historic botanical institutions in the world. It is open every day of the year and access is free. Its stunning position on Sydney Harbour and immediately adjacent to the Sydney CBD, the Sydney Opera House and the large public parklands of The Domain ensure it is one of the most visited attraction in Sydney. (http://en.wikipedia.org)

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Royal Botanic Garden

Sydney City

Sydney /ˈsɪdni/[5] is the state capital of New South Wales and the most populous city in Australia and Oceania.[6] Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds one of the world's largest natural harbours, and sprawls towards the Blue Mountains to the west.[7] Residents are together known as "Sydneysiders" and constitute the most multicultural city in Australia and one of the most multicultural cities in the world.[8][9][10]

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Sydney City

Darling Harbour

Darling Harbour is a harbour adjacent to the city centre of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It is also a large recreational and pedestrian precinct that is situated on western outskirts of the Sydney central business district. The locality extends northwards from Chinatown, along both sides of Cockle Bay to King Street Wharf on the east, and to the suburb of Pyrmont on the west. Cockle Bay is just one of the waterways that makes up Darling Harbour, which opens north into the much larger Port Jackson.

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Darling Harbour

Harbour Bridge

The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel through arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. The dramatic view of the bridge, the harbour, and the nearby Sydney Opera House is an iconic image of Sydney, and Australia. The bridge is nicknamed "The Coathanger" because of its arch-based design.[1][2] Furthermore, the bridge is ubiquitously known to Sydneysiders simply as "the Bridge".

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Harbour Bridge

Hyde Park

Hyde Park, the oldest public parkland in Australia,[1] is a 16.2-hectare (40-acre) park in the central business district of Sydney, New South Wales. Hyde Park is on the eastern side of the Sydney city centre. It is the southernmost of a chain of parkland that extends north to the shore of Sydney Harbour via The Domain and Sydney's Royal Botanic Gardens. Hyde Park is approximately rectangular in shape, being squared at the southern end and rounded at the northern end. It is bordered on the west by Elizabeth Street, on the east by College Street, on the north by St. James Road and Prince Albert Road and on the south by Liverpool Street.[1]

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Hyde Park

Mrs Macquarie's Chair

Mrs Macquarie's Chair (also known as Lady Macquarie's Chair[1]) is an exposed sandstone rock cut into the shape of a bench, on a peninsula in Sydney Harbour, hand carved by convicts from sandstone in 1810 for Governor Macquarie's wife Elizabeth. The peninsula itself is named Mrs Macquarie's Point, and is part of the The Domain, near the Royal Botanic Gardens.[2][3]

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Mrs Macquarie's Chair

Manly Beach

Manly Beach is a beach situated among the Northern Beaches of Sydney, Australia in Manly, New South Wales. From north to south, the three main sections are Queenscliff, North Steyne, and South Steyne. The beach was named by Capt. Arthur Phillip for the indigenous people living there. Philip wrote that "[the indigenous people's] confidence and manly behaviour made me give the name of Manly Cove to this place".[1]

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Manly Beach

Sydney Tower

Sydney Tower is Sydney's tallest structure, it is also the second tallest observation tower in the Southern Hemisphere, after Auckland's Sky Tower, though Sydney Tower Eye's main observation deck is almost 50 m (164 ft) higher than that of Auckland's Sky Tower. The name Sydney Tower has become common in daily usage, however the tower is also known as the Sydney Tower Eye, AMP Tower, Westfield Centrepoint Tower, Centrepoint Tower or just Centrepoint. The Sydney Tower is a member of the World Federation of Great Towers.[1]

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Sydney Tower

The Rocks

The Rocks is an urban locality, tourist precinct and historic area of Sydney's city centre, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. It is located on the southern shore of Sydney Harbour, immediately north-west of the Sydney central business district. The precinct and its immediate surroundings are administered independently of the local government area of the City of Sydney, by a New South Wales state government statutory authority, the Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority.

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The Rocks

Sydney Town Hall

The station is built on the site of Sydney's earliest colonial cemetery, the Old Sydney Burial Ground.[2][3][4] In 2008, part of this cemetery was being excavated from under the Town Hall. The station opened on 28 February 1932. It was built with six platforms, which were split over two levels with three platforms on each level. When the station opened, only four of the platforms were in use: platforms 1, 2 and 3 on the upper level and platform 6, served by escalators, on the lower level.[5] The other two platforms were built in preparation for a proposed western suburbs line from the city to Gladesville, as envisaged under the Bradfield scheme.[5] This line was never built, and the platforms (4 and 5) remained disused until incorporated into the Eastern Suburbs line when it was constructed in the 1970s.

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Sydney Town Hall